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Mark McCormick’s Reflection, Liturgical Resources and a Parish Update on the 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time

Mark McCormick offers the reflection this weekend. In it, he shares: “We are called to be servants of one another, modelled on our service to Christ. In our modern age, we are mostly used to serving ourselves or being served. We try hard and we work hard to support our households and we do this using the gifts and the talents God has given us.  Self-serve is the default option in the 21st century — whether at the grocery store or the gas station. Our independence is prized when we have attained it. Its loss is one of the greatest tragedies we can imagine in this modern age. This ethic of autonomy and self-service has brought us to a position where we see ourselves as sole architects in charge of our human journey. We tend to place ourselves at the centre, rather than placing God at the centre. In doing so, we risk losing our humility…The readings today encourage us to fundamentally reconsider our position in relation to God and to one another.” Continue reading Mark McCormick’s Reflection, Liturgical Resources and a Parish Update on the 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Jim Bleackley’s Reflection & a Parish Update on the Feast of the Assumption of Mary

In his reflection on the Feast of the Assumption of Mary, Fr. Jim shares: “We are invited to ponder the mystery of Christ’s resurrection through the experience of Mary. Today, we celebrate Mary’s assumption as a victory over death; a shining example for all who hear God’s Word and believe in the divine promises. The local traditions of the Assumption of Mary became an official teaching of the Catholic Church on November 1st, 1950. Pope Pius XII solemnly stated: ‘The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.’ The significance of the Church’s declaration of the Solemnity of the Assumption of Mary in 1950 was not lost on a world exhausted by world war, and the death of over 50 million human beings. At a moment in history, when the value of human life had been so subjected to mindless brutality and destruction, Mary — an obscure first century Palestinian woman–is held up as the epitope of human existence and purpose…” Continue reading Fr. Jim Bleackley’s Reflection & a Parish Update on the Feast of the Assumption of Mary

Eleanor Rabnett’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 19th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Eleanor Rabnett offers the reflection for the 19th Sunday of Ordinary Time and shares: “We are invited to taste and see that the Lord is good — not in a manner of trying out a new type of food, but rather allowing the fullness of God in the Eucharist to become a part of us…Gerald Darring tells us that Jesus is talking “about not just feeding but also becoming food when he says, ‘the bread I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world.’ Darring continues: ‘we are to sacrifice ourselves, as Jesus on the cross and in the Eucharist, for the sake of the poor ones… The Eucharist challenges us to become their food, so that they may complete the journey to the mountain of God.’

St. John Chrysostom preached and wrote about the transformation that takes place when we receive the Eucharist: he said, “’I receive him to become him, to be Eucharist for others.'”

Continue reading Eleanor Rabnett’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 19th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Richard Beaudette’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 18th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Richard Beaudette OMI offers the reflection for the 18th Sunday of Ordinary Time. Fr. Richard shares that the selection of readings are almost like a fairytale, in that they show the best and the worst potential for human behaviour.  The bread that Jesus gives is a reminder that God will nourish us and help us to live out the call to conversion. The readings serve as a reminder that as disciples of Jesus,  our call is not just to sit back and to enjoy the good gifts that God gives us. Rather, we have been called to a certain way of life; called to build the Kingdom of God in our world.

Liturgical Resources

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time – August 1 2021 – Liturgy of the Word for use at home

READINGS FOR THE EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 2021

READINGS FOR CHILDREN – 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time 2021

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time 2021 – Prayers of the Faithful

Mission Prayer

 

Parish Update

Free breakfast and snack boxes available

The Parish will once again receive a shipment of breakfast and snack boxes available for free to parishioners with school age children. The program is made possible by the Ottawa Network for Education and each box includes healthy breakfast and snack items. If interested, please contact the front office to pick up a box. Tel.: 613-233-4095, ext. 251 or [email protected]

A Call from the Parish Finance Council

The Parish Finance Council is looking for parishioners who are interested in serving on the Council. It is a permanent advisory body to the Pastor and the St. Joseph’s Parish Pastoral Council, responsible for ensuring they are well-informed in all their decision-making with respect to financial matters.

Members serve for 2-year renewable terms and are selected from among the parishioners, based on their experience in financial management to the extent possible. Accounting credentials and experience on boards of corporate bodies or associations or management teams where financial issues are considered as part of management’s deliberations are assets.

The Council generally meets on a monthly basis with a break during the summer. Additional details about the Council and its members may be found in its Terms of Reference posted on the Parish website. If interested, please email: [email protected] and your message will be forwarded to John Mark Keyes, Chair of the PFC.

Andrew Pump’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Andrew Pump offers the reflection at Mass this weekend and in it, he shares:

“John’s Gospel is not individualistic and apolitical, rather it is about the strength that Christ gives to the communities that proclaim him – even and especially those persecuted and on the road to martyrdom. The early Christians were a group of despised communities that were scapegoated by the Roman authorities all over the empire for political purposes. And these periods of persecution would flare up and subside up and down for 300 years. So this is the paradox, the folly of the cross, a community being killed is proclaiming they have received eternal life, those doing without and self-sacrificing are proclaiming that they are filled with the bread of life, and those persecuted are calling themselves blessed and grateful. God does not take away our earthly problems and trials, he spiritually transforms us so we can use poison as medicine, and not let life on life’s terms destroy us with despair, but become empowered within communities of shared struggle.” Continue reading Andrew Pump’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Fr. Jim Bleackey’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 16th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Jim offers the reflection for the sixteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time and shares:

“Last week when I was in the Oblate kitchen making a cup of coffee, I happened to look out the window and saw a group of people sitting in the garden, in front of the Women’s Centre and the Supper Table; relaxing in the sun and enjoying each other’s company. They were people who appeared to carry all their belongings with them and who were most likely guests who often come to our doors seeking food, refreshments and a place in our community. As I watched, I saw a young man digging into his pack and when he appeared to be missing something, looked around to the others in the group. Immediately, someone pulled out a sweater from his bag and gave it to him. Another person gave him a sandwich. And someone else offered him an apple. From my viewpoint, it appeared that the group was concerned  for the young man, doing what they could to help him out.  This is another example of how generous the poor can be with those in need…” Continue reading Fr. Jim Bleackey’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 16th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Mike Britton’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time

This weekend’s reflection is offered by Mike Britton, in which he shares: “You and I are a work in progress. And the work is done not just by ourselves in this life, but by grace from God. That grace comes in many ways and one of the greatest opportunities for it is in each other. What else is the good we do, after all, than God’s actions through us?” Continue reading Mike Britton’s Reflection and a Parish Update for the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Richard Beaudette’s Reflection and a Parish Update on the 14th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Fr. Richard Beaudette OMI offers the homily this weekend and is also presiding at our in-person liturgies. He shares:

“The idea of being anointed prophet is one well beyond our notion of probability. Who of us feels competent to speak God’s Word in a way that calls and challenges others to conversion? Of course, as Paul would remind us, our baptismal call to be prophetic is not something that we can do on our own. Rather than offering a life of comfort and safety, this baptismal call puts great expectations on us; expectations that can only be met when we recognize our individual weakness and open ourselves to the indwelling of the Spirit and the power of Christ dwelling in us and personified in the Christian community. As prophets, we are called to proclaim that the reign of God is at hand and to co-create a just and loving society. ” Continue reading Fr. Richard Beaudette’s Reflection and a Parish Update on the 14th Sunday of Ordinary Time

John Rietschlin’s Reflection and a Parish Update on the 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time

John Rietschlin offers the reflection at our Masses this weekend. John shares:

“Many of us will know that Julian was a 15th century mystic who spent some fifty years, most of her adult life, living in a single room during the Bubonic plague. Julian experienced a series of visions from God as a young woman and then spent many decades praying and reflecting on these visions and writing about them. When she died, she left a single book written over a lifetime—the first book by a woman in the English language. This book is the source of our knowledge about her and her visions. What did she see? In the midst of the darkness and death from the plague, Julian saw God’s total goodness. She saw that every human being is totally “oned” with God. In the midst of fear, she saw that God is fully present in every aspect of creation. The beauty shining through a flower, a sunset, a smile is the beauty of God. She saw that sin causes us to lose sight of God, but that God never loses sight of us—God continues to love every one of us.” Continue reading John Rietschlin’s Reflection and a Parish Update on the 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time

A Reflection from the St. Joe’s Refugee Outreach Committee and a Parish Update

On World Refugee Day,  the reflection at our weekend liturgies is offered by members of the St. Joe’s Refugee Outreach Committee. The Committee shares:

“Perhaps we do have power to calm the seas and winds that drive people from their homes, as well as to provide a more welcoming place to those who make it here safely. Whether as a country, as a community, or one to one, we need to stay awake, to care for and support one another…” Continue reading A Reflection from the St. Joe’s Refugee Outreach Committee and a Parish Update