Reflection for Sunday, February 11, 2018 by Ewelina Frackowiak

Posted by on Feb 15, 2018 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Reflection – February 11, 2018 by Ewelina Frackowiak Leviticus 13.12, 4546 1 Corinthians 10.3111.1 Mark 1.4045 What makes a leper unclean? Is it leprosy? No, leprosy is just an illness that has its symptoms but certainly no power to force anyone to shave his head and scream “unclean” whenever he is in proximity to others. The illness is one thing; the judgement another. The leper is not responsible for reactions and feelings that arise in those who are in his presence. How come in Jesus’s that feeling was compassion, whereas in those who wrote down the laws in Leviticus it was fear? I imagine the healing in today’s gospel being twofold: first Jesus erased the harsh judgement which the leper must have internalized. “Be made clean!” Then he healed him from leprosy. It happened in two stages justas with the healing of a paralytic, remember, the lucky fellow who was lowered on his bed straight from a roof of a crowded house to Jesus’ feet.1 Jesus said to him first: “your sins are forgiven”. In other words: You are released from the grip that your own judgement has on you, you are released from the judgement that prevented you from loving yourself and from loving others. Only after Jesus said that, he healed the man from paralysis. Is there something that you consider a quality of yourself and that you are ashamed of? Your personal leper. If that disliked quality is related to an emotion, that is, if you think that you are an angry person, a jealous person, or a fearful person, for example, consider dropping the judgement about these emotions and whenever it is possible stay with them without reacting. If there is a story line that emerges alongside your emotion, let us say you begin thinking that you are a victim and the whole world is a vicious and loveless place because your coworkeror friend insulted you, recognize this story simply as a creation of your mind and go back to the feeling. When you drop the story line, the feeling itself will dissolve and you will build up the courage to face yourself fully. Whatever the leper represents in you is, is NOT unclean, is NOT shameful. Our ability to reach out and love is very much related to the way we view ourselves.2 The more you are open and fearless when facing yourself, the more you are open and fearless when facing each moment of your life. Because you know your desires, your jealousy, your selfpity, etcetera, you do not run away whenever with an encounter with someone else these feelings emerge. You recognize that others are   1 Luke 5.1726 2 Trungpa, Chögyam.2010....

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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Posted by on Dec 23, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Dear friends, It is this time of the year again where we are celebrating something special. Whether you are surrounded by loved ones or simply by yourself, always remember that you are never alone. Indeed, Christmas is the day where God gave us a forever friend. No matter who you are and what you do, Jesus is here for you. It is okay if you believe those words are “cliché” but in reality, the fruits of the Holy Spirit will always remain relevant today. This year, we wish you to rediscover this exceptional and extraordinary relationship that belongs to you but we hope that you will come and share it with us at St. Joe’s. Much joy to you all! St. Joseph’s Parish...

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Flight to Freedom: The Canadian Refugee Experience Since 1957

Posted by on Oct 16, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Location: St. Paul University and the Canadian Museum of History This three-day conference (October 21-23, 2017) explores Canada’s involvement in the central issue of our time: the global search by refugees for a safe home in light of this country’s history of immigration and nation-building. Recognizing Canada’s 150th celebrations and also the 60th anniversary of the arrival and settlement of 38,000 Hungarian refugees during 1957, this conference uses their example to investigate how government and civil society can work together. We begin with the example of Hungarian refugees because this was the first time that such a large group of refugees arrived here from one county. That experience, identified by the Canadian government in 2010 as an event of national historic significance, helped shape the development of subsequent refugee policies and programs. When large numbers of Ugandan Asians and Vietnamese refugees arrived in the 1970s, and more recently the refugees escaping Syria, Canada had the example of 1957 as a benchmark. This bilingual conference will look at the impact of the arrival of refugees from these and other groups on Canadian society and culture. What, then, is Canada’s role today, given the global rise of anti-immigrant and anti-refugee movements? This conference and its diverse cultural component address this important question. The keynote address will be given by The Hon Bob Rae. The conference is open to the general public and is organized by the University of Ottawa, Saint Paul University, The Canada-Hungary Educational Foundation, The Canadian Immigration Historical Society, St. Joseph’s Parish, The Canadian Museum of History, The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, and other interested partner institutions and individuals. The full conference registration fee is $75. Reduced fees for students or those wishing to register for a single day is $30. To pay online in advance, please visit Canada Helps here: https://www.canadahelps.org/en/charities/canada-hungary-educational-foundation-fondation-educative-canada-hongrie/ For Canada Helps payments, please not that you will automatically receive a charitable tax receipt from the site, on behalf of the key conference organizer, the Canada-Hungary Educational Foundation. But to help cover the administrative costs of using this service, please make your payment in the amount of $80 and please also indicate your full name when donating. You may bring your Canada Helps tax receipt as proof of payment to the conference. Please find the Conference schedule here and visit the Conference Facebook page for more information....

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